Adventure meets history in stunning Kaş

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Kaş is filled with striking views and bountiful history. (Source: Pixabay)

Kaş, which dates back to antiquity and has a rather offbeat bohemian vibe, is popular with both Turkish and foreign tourists. The town offers a dramatic setting of the mountains and the Mediterranean Ocean. With clean and calm waters free of jet skis, this is one swimming holiday not to miss.

Kaş originally became popular with backpackers in the 1980s, later with divers, and now with swimmers.

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History lovers with an appreciation for nature won’t regret a stay in this old port town. The best thing to do is spend a day swimming and hiking at the ruins of Aperlai of the ancient Roman Empire. You’ll also see a surprising variety of wrecks of ancient ships and ancient cities sunk under the sea by earthquakes over the centuries. The sea is so perfectly clear that the details of city buildings such as staircases or columns can be seen from the boat.

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Dive into history: Kekova Island is a sunken city you can explore. (Source: Wikicommons)

The Lycian period

In the ancient times of Lycia, Kaş was originally called Habesos and was later renamed as Antiphellos. This small port town was once an unspoilt fishing village and has of one of the oldest settlements of Lycia.

It was a member of the Lycian League, and its importance during this time is confirmed by the presence of one of the richest Lycian necropoleis. In the Hellenistic period and under the Roman Empire it served as the port of Phellus. The town suffered because of Arab incursions, then was annexed under the name of Andifli to the Anatolian Sultanate of Rum, led by the Seljuks. After the demise of the Seljuks, it came under the Ottomans.

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A street in Kaş with traditional houses and a Lycian tomb in the background. (Source: Wikicommons)

The town suffered because of Arab incursions, then was annexed under the name of Andifli to the Anatolian Sultanate of Rum, led by the Seljuks. After the demise of the Seljuks, it came under the Ottomans. (Insert photo of Greek abandoned houses) In 1923, because of the Exchange of populations between Greece and Turkey after the Greco-Turkish War, the majority of the population, which was of Greek origin, left the town for Greece. Abandoned Greek houses can still be seen at Kaş today.

In 1923, because of the Exchange of populations between Greece and Turkey after the Greco-Turkish War, the majority of the population, which was of Greek origin, left the town for Greece. Abandoned Greek houses can still be seen at Kaş today.

#Kaş #antiquity #travel #Roman #ocean

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